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Debby Summey:Winyah Road revisited

  • Friday, March 15, 2013

  • Updated Monday, September 23, 2013 10:53 am

Carlos Long (center) circa 1941

My friend, Carlos Riscus Long, asked me to help identify the little girls in the photograph accompanying this column.  Carlos, of course, is in the center, wearing an outfit suited for little boys in the early 1940s.  

I said, “Carlos, you have to give the public some clues, like where you were living at the time of the photograph, where you went to school, where you were born.”   Carlos doesn’t like to talk about himself, but agreed to share the needed information.

Carlos was born in 1936 in Panama City, Fla., to Carl Monroe Long and Eva Hightower Long. They were living there because Carl was working for International Paper, as was Carl’s father, Riscus Sherman Long. This was one of a long line of IP mills they helped build all over the Southeast.  In 1937, the family moved to Georgetown to build our own IP mill.  

Carl, Eva, and baby Carlos lived in an apartment house on South Frasier Street until Carl was called to IP’s mill in Springhill, Louisiana.  They moved back to Georgetown in 1940.

The family first lived in what Carlos called “Goat Hill”, the area known today as Bayview in Maryville.  After a year, they moved to 218 Winyah Road, the house Carlos identifies as “home.”

The Winyah Road neighborhood just happens to be the same neighborhood I grew up in and Carlos and I set off on a trip down memory lane.  I wrote about growing up in this neighborhood in an earlier column because, like Carlos, some of the happiest moments of my life were spent there.

Carlos lived in the block of Winyah Road between Hazard and Kaminski Streets.  He fondly remembers his neighbors:  the Avants, Arthur and Lena Mae Simpson, Mrs. Janie Campbell, her daughter and son-in-law, Emma and Willie Skinner and their two sons, Eddie and Campbell.

The Presbyterian Church was on the corner and that’s where I used to roller skate because the sidewalk around the church was so smooth.  We talked about the families who lived in the neighborhood: the Huttos, the Overtons, the Broaches, the Rowes, the Richards, and the Wards. In my time, the Hoppers, the Howells, the St. Germains, Mary Craig, the Waddells, and the Lamberts also lived there.

Carlos lived a stone’s throw from what is now known as Mike Johnson Park and spent many years there playing baseball.  Rival teams at that time included the Winyah Athletics (coached by Kay Richards), the Cannon Street Cannonballs, and the Cleland Street Tigers.  At Winyah High, Carlos played on the football and baseball teams.  He didn’t play basketball because it coincided with duck hunting season, which came first for Carlos.

Carlos eventually grew up, left his idyllic childhood behind, and, like his father and grandfather, went to work for IP.  That job took him all over the place, but he took time out to marry the love of his live, Shirley Jean Norris from Erwin, North Carolina.  They ended up in Texas in 1976 and they still split their time between there and Georgetown. Along the way they had two sons: Carlos Jr., who lives in Oklahoma, and Mark, who lives in Oregon.   

Getting back to the photograph, Carlos and I think it was taken around 1941.  Carlos attended Miss Charlotte Kaminski’s kindergarten on Queen Street before entering Winyah Graded School in 1942.   Was this photograph taken at kindergarten, at a May Day celebration, a church event?

If anyone recognizes the children in the photograph, please let me know and I’ll pass the information on to Carlos.  

To Carlos ... thanks for the memories.

I may be reached at (843) 446-4777 or email at djsummey@gmail.com.

     

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