A View From The PastEvents of past years as chronicled through the county newspapers

  • Friday, July 25, 2014

100 Years Ago

Pawleys Island, July 23 – Life on the island recently has been like the rose and its thorns, for unprecedented breezes have been bringing us mosquitoes; but after a “season” of rain, Sunday night a stiff northeast wind has blown the pests away and made us all dig out the coats and blankets.

Fishing has been fine all the week and the islanders have lived on the fat of the land and the sea, for fruit and vegetables have been as plentiful as fish, shelled and finny.

There are many enquiries now for cottages and for boarding accommodations; more than can be met.

Services at the little Episcopal Chapel Sunday were made particularly interesting by the addition of Mrs. Henry Harby of Sumter to the choir.

Mrs. Harby has a wonderful voice and her offeratory was especially enjoyed.

75 Years Ago

Dr. G.S.T. Peeples, county health officer, says there is no sound reason why an individual with children cannot to come to our beaches if common sense is used.

This county is free from polio. Children under 13 years, coming from counties where there are active cases of poliomyelitis are placed in isolation for a period of two weeks. Isolation does not mean that the child has to be placed in a dark room.

Of course, in a boarding house that extreme would almost have to be carried out, especially where there are other children.

On the other hand, in private cottages, isolation is a simple matter and where common sense is used, a child can go fishing, bathing, et cetera, as long as no other children are present.

It stands to reason that an isolated child could not go to the pavilion, the post office, amusement centers, stores, etc., where children not under isolation are allowed to go.

50 Years Ago

Ailing Whirly Bird Alights On Farm Near Pawleys Island: A Marine Corps helicopter made an emergency landing near Pawleys Island about 5:30 P.M. Friday and remained grounded for several days in the small Simmonsville community.

The whirly-bird came to rest in an acre-sized, pine-rimmed plot on one of the farms of James Simmons about five miles south of Pawleys Island.

Crewmen from the New River Marine Air Corps Facility guarded the helicopter since Friday and received supplies from the Myrtle Beach Air Force Base.

They were relieved about 2 p.m. Monday as a second Marine helicopter arrived from Camp LeJeune with a work crew to repair the mechanical failure.

Khaki-clad Marines set to work to get the trouble corrected, but declined to answer questions, explaining,” The last thing the Captain told us was not to make any statements.”

25 Years Ago

There are signs everywhere that alarming traces of dioxin have been found in fish taken from the Sampit River.

In fact, four signs are displayed prominently at Georgetown’s public boat landing at East Bay Park.

Agents for the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DEHEC) posted more than a dozen white laminated warning signs at public landings and in the Sampit earlier this week.

In addition to posting the signs, DEHEC agents warned any fisherman they saw on the Sampit River about the advisory. “They have been patrolling the river warning fishermen,” said DEHEC spokesman Thom Berry.

“If a person wants to fish, we’re not going to arrest them. That’s an individual personal preference.”

10 Years Ago

Construction workers clearing debris in Murrells Inlet last week unearthed what is believed to be a Civil War-era black-powder Parrott mortar shell.

The projectile-looking device was uncovered at the construction site for the new subdivision being built south of Oyster Landing on Highway 17.

A worker at the site brought the object to the sheriff’s satellite office in Murrells Inlet in the bed of his pickup truck around noon Wednesday.

After evacuating the building, the item was placed on the ground at the back of the complex to await the arrival of a bomb disposal unit from SLED in Columbia.

Explosive experts from SLED transported the round to SLED headquarters in Columbia.

– Elizabeth Robertson Huntsinger

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