A View From The PastEvents of past years as chronicled through the county newspapers

  • Wednesday, July 2, 2014

100 Years Ago

Plantersville folks for a long time have had a superstitious dread of passing near the church of Prince Frederick’s, Pee Dee, in the night time. Indeed, many of them wouldn’t go near the church in daylight.

They told varied and highly embellished stories of ghosts and “Platt-eye,” and such spooks. Now the ghosts and spooks have been laid to rest by Mr. T.J. Ryan, who is giving the old edifice an overhauling.

In making repairs to the towers a few days ago, Mr. Ryan routed out a rookery of white owls – big fellows with wide, staring eyes and raucous voices. White owls are rare in this section of the county.

In addition Mr. Ryan found a nest of honey bees in the tower. Under the rafters up in the tower a snake six feet long was found and killed.

The beautiful old church is undergoing a thorough overhauling and repairs. No clue has yet been found the identity of the party or parties who tried to steal the church’s Parian marble font.

75 Years Ago

Times Tattles by I.D. Clare – John Heineman and “Bubber” Joe Cathou pedaling two young ladies, who were waiting for the bus, up and down Front Street Saturday night.

Having no horn on their mode of transportation, they would let out an Indian war whoop every now and then to warn passersby.

The large old house on the corner of Prince and Cannon streets, known as the old Springs house, has been purchased by W.B. Somers for a price reported in excess of $5,000.

Mr. Somers, the local Ford dealer, is having the place completely remodeled for his residence. The transaction was handled through J.A. Doyle, local real estate agent.

50 Years Ago

Following the trend of restoring old houses of historic interest in Georgetown, Senator and Mrs. C.C. Grimes Jr. have completed the renovation of a home on Prince Street, which has emerged a handsome townhouse for them, quaintly charming in appearance, but modern and efficient in convenience.

Built by a Mr. Cuttino in 1790, the house became the property of his daughter, who was later the wife of Henry Savage Smith.

Actually the house has never left the possession of a member of the Smith family connections, and it seems quite appropriate that Harriet Horry Pyatt Grimes, a granddaughter of the late Elinor Smith Pyatt, should be instrumental in renewing the life and beauty of the old building.

25 Years Ago

Georgetown will provide the sizzle with the steak Saturday when thousands of residents and visitors flock to the historic seaport city for the second annual Harborwalk Celebration.

The turn-of-the-century festival promises to be as well, if not better, put on than last year’s affair, which was held to dedicate the 12-foot-wide, 1,000-foot-long Harborwalk along the Sampit River.

Years ago, the wharves along the Sampit were the hub of economic activity for Georgetown County. Today Front Street and its Harborwalk are awakening to a new era, brightened by an acute appreciation of its past.

The Harborwalk is an affirmation of what Georgetown is: A historic seaport community.

10 Years Ago

As people along the Harborwalk feed them, gators grow bold. Three young alligators gathered Tuesday afternoon between the Georgetown Harborwalk and the bank of the Sampit River as a woman and two small children tossed food into the water to feed them.

Paddling his kayak in the Sampit River Saturday, Bob Shank was helping the Lions Club with its rubber duck race as part of the annual Harborwalk celebration. He was expecting to retrieve a bunch of tiny, yellow, plastic quackers. In the end, he was lucky to retrieve his hand from the mouth of a 7-foot gator.

“It sounds like that animal has been fed and it made an attempt to feed on whatever that person had in his hand,” said Derrell Snipes, chief wildlife section at DNR, noting the paddle Shank was holding in the edge of the water.

“It may have been used to feeding on things thrown to it.”

– Elizabeth Robertson Huntsinger

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