Neighbors being neighbors

  • Friday, May 23, 2014

  • Updated Friday, May 23, 2014 10:05 am

When I was in Basic Training one of my best friends was a guy named Cummings. He was a big city guy, and me being from the country we made an odd pair. The way he talked the only time he had ever been in the woods was when we were on road marches, so to him being in the woods was a whole new experience. We would talk about the differences between city life and small town life at night after the lights went out, sometimes he couldn’t get over how big the differences were.

“What do you guys do, sit around and watch the light change at the red light?”

To him, knowing just about everybody in town, or knowing who was kin to who just blew his mind.

The idea of everybody knowing what was going on with everybody else was just too much. It seemed like in the big city the less you knew about your neighbor, the less they knew about you.

Then I mentioned, what if you need some help, he said, “Well I guess you were on your own.” I don’t know about you, but I’m kinda glad we don’t live like that around here.

It reminds me of one time when Mom and Dad’s water pump quit. They never had city water, they had a well, like a lot of us back then, and some still do.

Well Momma called Mr. Preston, he was the neighborhood well man, and he must have called someone else, because before you knew it, the folk’s yard was full of trucks. And before sundown they had water.

I remember the morning after Hugo; we all have our Hugo stories. Trees everywhere, and being how they lived out in the country, it was going to be a while before DOT even thought about getting out there. But one guy didn’t wait on the government to get its act together with committees and such. Nope, he just grabbed his sons and some chainsaws and his tractor, and just started clearing the roads.

He wasn’t the only one, neighbors helped neighbors, and before long we had some sense of normalcy back. Ms. Joyce, our neighbor, she cooked a purlow and fed half the neighborhood, most folks were digging out, and a hot meal was the last thing we thought we’d get that day.

Even my oldest daughter Jessie, when she had to have open heart surgery, the neighbors gathered around.

As any parent can tell you, when your child is sick, that is one of the most helpless feelings you can ever have.

Before I knew it, we were getting phone calls, “What can we do.” Now it’s a Southern tradition when something’s wrong, we gonna feed you. And that’s what they did.

They had a fundraiser for her, the Shriners, the folks at my church, and too many other folks for me to mention here.

And it sure helped, they didn’t have too, but that’s what neighbors are for. They didn’t ask they just came a running.

But now it’s somebody else’s turn. On Friday June 6 they are having a fundraiser for Mr. Douglas Walters.

Mr. Douglas is well know around town for his purlows, but not just for that, but for showing up anytime they having one for somebody else with his big purlow pot, the biggest I’ve ever seen, to help anytime someone else is in need. But this time he’s the one the communities coming together for, and they sure could use your help.

They are going to fixing BBQ chicken, 2500 plates, and they would love to fix you one. If you’re interested contact Shirley Kellahan-Grant at 833-3851, or a good many of the local churches in Andrews have signup sheets.

They are $7 dollars a plate and they will need to know by Tuesday the 27 of May, in order to get your order in.

But before that, on May 30, at 7 in the evening at Andrews High football field they are going to be holding the annual Relay for Life for the American Cancer Society.

It’s held every year to celebrate the survivors, to mourn the ones who lost their battle, and to raise money to help others continue their fight.

Along with the Survivors Walk, they will be having food and crafts, along with other goodies.

Come on out and help them in there continuing battle against cancer.

“ and the Second is like unto it, you shall love your neighbor as yourself,” something to think about.

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