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Zoning Board of Appeals hears appeal about reality TV show

  • Friday, September 6, 2013

Anita Crone / For The Times
Hamlin O’Kelly is Warren Stedman’s attorney. He asked those who support Stedman’s appeal to stand.

MURRELLS INLET S.C. — The Georgetown County Zoning Board of Appeals voted 4 to 1 Tuesday night to deny an appeal by Warren Stedman over storage containers. The containers were near Kings Krest in Murrells Inlet, three doors from Stedman’s residence.
Kings Krest was used by 495 Productions for filming for a TV reality show
For the month of August, the cast of the show, which goes under the working title “Down South,” lived in Kings Krest while filming went on 24 hours a day. Stedman said the noise, drinking and lights from the crew were not in keeping with the residential nature of his neighborhood. He filed his  appeal with the ZBA, asking the county to shut down production because of violations of the zoning ordinance.
Although the cast and crew have mostly left the inlet, Stedman opted to pursue his appeal to ensure “something like this does not happen again.”
Stedman contends that four temporary use permits were improperly granted for trailers placed on property near Kings Krest, and that the use of the property for filming a reality show was in opposition to the residential zoning for the property.
Boyd Johnson, the county’s zoning administrator, approved the trailers — essentially contractor’s trailers — near the filming site July 19 and certificates of occupancy were granted Aug. 1.
The county maintains that interpreting the rules rests solely with the zoning administrator. It also states in its response that filming is not addressed in the zoning ordinances and that the trailers did not violate its regulations.
Almost before the first camera took its first shot, opposition to the filming spread throughout Murrells Inlet, spurring the start of a Facebook page, “We ‘Just Said ‘No’ to the Dirty South,” that lauded businesses that did not cooperate with the filming.
Stedman, however, was the only person to take what is essentially legal action, paying the $500 fee to challenge the county’s decision.

By Anita Crone
For The Times


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