Erin Spatz: Ink and creativity

  • Tuesday, February 5, 2013

  • Updated Monday, September 23, 2013 10:50 am

Of all of my children, Denver is the most creative. Not just artistically, but in lots of other ways as well.

He has the ability to even turn a punishment into an opportunity to create something.
He was recently sent outside to pay restitution for saying the word "crap" to me.
He was to clean the backyard of dog "business", but the 10 minutes leading up to going outside to clean up involved a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth.
But, once he was out there I didn't hear a peep, and he looked deep in thought.
He came in to tell me that when he was all grown up he was going to invent a vacuum for the yard, so no one would ever have to do that again.  
And even though I am biased, if he really decides to do that, I believe him.

But just like all creative beings Denver has his favorite "medium" and it's ink. Ink in all forms.
Paint, markers, stamp pads, pens, if it has ink in it he loves it!
I made it through two children before anyone ever colored on the wall.
Dylan and Autumn never even attempted to color on anything other than paper. Then Denver comes along, and not only does he color on the wall, but also the tile and grout.
Not just with a washable maker, no, but a permanent black marker.

I will admit that my response to seeing marker all over my newly painted dining room and floor was an actual scream.
Very similar to a horror movie scream. Clearly, Denver intended to go big.
From where I sit typing this I can still see the black tile grout and the tiny bit left on the wall. Someday that'll be funny, right?

If only that was his last meeting with a permanent black marker, but alas it was not.
He has also colored himself with a permanent black marker, and not just in places that could be covered by clothes.
Because if you're going to color yourself, why not color everything!
He colored his face too, and managed to make himself look a unibrowed Hitler, which is definitely not what you want your three-year-old to look like as you send them to preschool.

Luckily for Denver, Chandler came along, and I am pretty sure he viewed her as his human canvas.
And she has cheerfully sat through all of his "art" applications.
As an infant, he colored Chandler's forehead with a pen which was washable.
He has colored her legs, and even the bottoms of her feet.
Most recently he took his smiley face stamp and put a smiley face on each of her eyelids.
If you've ever tried to discipline your child while trying not to laugh, let me just  say that it is nearly impossible when one of the two kids standing before you has a pair of blue smiley faces that you can only see when she blinks!

I know that I should take away the "ink" in Denver's life, or make him sit still while he has it.
Or at the very least, get rid of all permanent ink in our house. But to do that would take away part of Denver.

And really, what's a little marker on my wall when it just reminds me to accept my kids for who they are, and look forward to who they'll become.

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